Our Point of View: Unintended Acceleration: Toyota Addresses the Issues

November 06, 2009
Recently, there has been some controversy regarding a safety recall that Toyota is undertaking. We want to take this opportunity to set the record straight with a chronology of the events of the past week.
 
On Friday, October 30, we began sending letters to Toyota owners and Lexus owners about a defect related to motor vehicle safety that exists on certain models. The defect is the potential for an unsecured or incompatible driver’s floor mat to interfere with the accelerator pedal and cause it to get stuck in the wide open position. As an interim precaution, we asked owners to take out any removable driver’s floor mat and not replace it with any other floor mat until a vehicle-based remedy can be developed and implemented on their vehicle. When such a remedy is determined, owners will be notified.
 
In addition, the letter contains instructions for owners on what to do should they experience accelerator pedal interference.
 
On Monday, November 2, Toyota distributed a press release announcing the customer letter campaign and cited a recent decision by NHTSA related to unintended acceleration on a Lexus vehicle.
 
On Tuesday and Wednesday, a series of media reports circulated, stating that there was growing suspicion by some Toyota and Lexus owners, that a glitch of some kind in the electronic engine management system was the cause of reports of unintended acceleration. There were also reports in the media that Toyota’s press release implied that the company believed the only issue was the removal of floor mats and that its future recall would not involve any other remedies.
 
First, the question of unintended acceleration involving Toyota and Lexus vehicles has been one of the most thoroughly and repeatedly investigated issues by Toyota, as well as by the engineering experts at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Six times in the past six years NHTSA has undertaken an exhaustive review of allegations of unintended acceleration on Toyota and Lexus vehicles and six times the agency closed the investigation without finding any electronic engine control system malfunction to be the cause of unintended acceleration.
 
Just last week NHTSA denied a request for an additional investigation of unwanted and unintended acceleration of model year 2007 Lexus ES350 vehicles and model years 2002-2003 Lexus ES300.  After conducting an extensive technical review of the issue, including interviews with consumers who had complained of unwanted acceleration,  NHTSA concluded that “…the only defect trend related to vehicle speed control in the subject vehicles involved the potential for accelerator pedals to become trapped near the floor by out-of-position or inappropriate floor mat installations." (click here for ODI report)
 
Finally, on Wednesday of this week, NHTSA issued a statement that read in part that “ A press release put out by Toyota earlier this week about their recall of 3.8 million Toyota and Lexus vehicles inaccurately stated NHTSA had reached a conclusion that no defect exists in vehicles in which the driver’s floor mat is compatible with the vehicle and properly secured. NHTSA has told Toyota and consumers that removing the recalled floor mats is the most immediate way to address the safety risk and avoid the possibility of the accelerator becoming stuck. But it is simply an interim measure.”
 
It was never Toyota’s intention to mislead or provide inaccurate information and we regret any confusion our press release may have caused with the media and with the public. Toyota agrees with NHTSA’s position that the removal of the floor mats is an interim measure and that further vehicle-based action is required. We are in the process of developing appropriate vehicle-based remedies that will help prevent accelerator pedal entrapment. In the meantime we will continue to keep you updated on the floor mat situation as more information becomes available.
 
Irv Miller
Group Vice President, Environmental and Public Affairs
Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc.

Displaying comments 1 - 5 of 157:


samuel said...
hello. am samuel; i will li ke that if you can introduce some of your product to nigeria annd allso most of your motors enginers because most of toyota motors dilers the amount of ther things are much and they can atend to every body in nigeria so if you can iitroduce it youcan never regret foe doing it.
11/10/10 at 12:00 AM

Linnie Todd said...
Maybe its called an "accident". Everybody wants to blame someone for accidents and life is not fair. I believe life is life and just live it - be as happy as possible and I am so proud I live in America where we can comment. By the way I drive with both feet, one for the brake and one for the gas peddle. Never had a wreck -YET! Just lucky.
7/14/10 at 12:00 AM

Mazu said...
hello everybody. toyota knew about the problem in late october 2009. it is now may 11, 2010. where is the fix? if it is really just a floor mat problem, shouldn't the problem be fixed by now?
5/11/10 at 12:00 AM

Scott Bailey said...
For many months, I have wondered if the tuning program in the ECU could be causing acceleration issues. The tuning programs in these cars are written in assembly language. They could be read using any hex editing program (granted, I don't believe that they could be interpreted very easily). Now, let's say that there was some sort of ROM failure where some of the memory locations in the fuel map suddenly turned from their regular hexadecimal numbers to "FF". What would happen? Most of the time, the car runs very poorly at specific load values/rpm. But, what if the failed memory location "FF" caused fuel injection duty cycle to increase to a very high percentage. I believe that "FF" is the highest hexadecimal number that a byte can represent (255) and, numerically, is higher than any number that would be used in a fuel injection duty cycle (at least that I am aware of). Couldn't that cause the engine to accelerate? The other thing that could cause issues is the ECU getting the wrong information from one of the sensors like the throttle position sensor.
5/8/10 at 12:00 AM

Izak Burger said...
I've been reading everything I can on this issue because I am very interested from an engineering viewpoint, and also because I have always been a great fan of Toyota products. Here in Africa, they are very popular because of their reliability. Personally I am not worried, for I drive a Diesel Corolla (not available in all markets) and it has a vacuum pump (probably on the front/back of the alternator as is usually the case). But I wonder about the petrol (or gas as the Americans say) models. Facts: 1) The power brakes are driven using manifold pressure, 2) with a wide open throttle, there is little or no vacuum, 3) there is a vacuum reserve which allows one or two vacuum assisted brake attempts even if the engine is off or vacuum is otherwise unavailable and 4) the brakes are strong enough to overpower the engine. That means that when sudden unintended acceleration does occur, you will always be able to brake. The brakes are still hydraulic and not at all linked to the electronic throttle, so it is highly unlikely that the brakes would fail at the same time. The only exceptions would be if you had a vacuum leak and the reserve vacuum is depleted (with no possibility of replenishment from the engine, since the throttle is fully open), or if the driver, in a state of panic, pumps away the reserve vacuum. In this case, the brake pedal becomes hard and even though you still have brakes, it will be hard to stop the vehicle and unless you know about it, you might be mistaken into thinking your brakes have failed. What I am currently wondering about, is 1) how many brake attempts you get from the reserve vacuum and 2) if it is still possible to stop the vehicle if you have depleted the vacuum reserve. Combined with a panicky driver pumping away the reserve, and an actual wide open throttle, that could account for drivers being unable to stop the vehicle despite pressing down on the brake.
5/5/10 at 12:00 AM

John said...
I don't know that much about Toyotas but I can tell you that with some cars shutting off the engine will have a profound effect on the braking power. I was driving my '99 mustang on the highway when the accessory belt snapped (it only has one). I didn't have any problems steering the car without power steering, but getting the car stopped was much more difficult. Braking power was markedly reduced and I had to allot plenty of space in front of me to slow down. The car has a hydroboost system for the brakes that runs off the accessory belt. If the engine shuts off it will have the same effect.
4/7/10 at 12:00 AM

Steve said...
Of course lives are worth something but the worth of the media is questionable. Questionable too is the fact that these problems seem to have only surfaced in the USA. One might assume then that (a) the American Toyotas are different from those in every other country or (b) the media hype has distorted the real facts or (c) American drivers are dumber than those from other countries. I wonder which one strikes a chord with you?
4/4/10 at 12:00 AM

Elisha said...
I lease a Toyota 4Runner and I had a friend tell me the other day not to worry about my truck because it was manufactured in Japan. I ask why the difference. He told me that Japan uses different parts than the others. I've never had a problem with my 4Runner...knock on wood :)
3/26/10 at 12:00 AM

Prius owner said...
I own a 2008 Prius and the only acceleration problem I have ever had was once when I was using cruise control like "Concerned Citizen" states. I was going down a hill when the car sped up. Concerned Citizen does not have a Prius and this happened, so maybe it is something that happens with a lot of cars. I wonder how many of these acceleration issues happened while using cruise control?
3/25/10 at 12:00 AM

Concened Citizen said...
Comments for Toyota I wold like to share my thoughts on the toyota vehicles incidents. I do not claim to be an expert on vehicles but have driven cars for over 30 years. I do not own a Toyota vehicle but my current vehicle is a foreign manufacturer. However, I just want to comments on sudden acceleration. Most of my life I hve driven using the cruise control on highways and streets when i deem it safe to do so. I have always used the cruise control whenever possible. However, sometimes while driving with the cruise control I have experienced suddenly acceleration at a high rate of speed. I then have to quickly slow the car down turning the cruise off or quickly braking. It would sometimes take the brakes extra time to slow down andi would sometime happen without the cruise control being set. I have taken my car in for servicing many times and the different mechanics would find nothing. This has happen to me some of the cars I have owned but not frequently; just once in a while. the experience was always like a sudden acceleration where the car suddenly takes flight without me putting my foot on the gas. It is like when you have the cruise set and you are heading down a hill and the car accelerates 3 to 5 miles faster. However, the acceleration I experienced was at a faster speed and quicker rate; almost downright scary. I would have to react fast to slow my vehicle down to a more normal speed. I always thought about it later and would mention it to my mechanic but they still always found nothing. I always worried about it but would chalk it up to using the cruise control too much. So I would institute better procedural control (i.e. use a lower speed set), the next time I used the cruise control. I know it is just a thouht however, it may be worth looking into if yo have not done so. aready. The automatic cruise control be a link to some of the problems Toyota vehicles are experiencing. Hope This Helps Laruby76.
3/13/10 at 12:00 AM

DQH said...
I shuttled rental cars for a rental car company. I sometimes returned cars with broken power stearing units from airport lots back to the mechanic's service center. The stearing was heavy, but I was strong enough to keep the car under control. I suppose some people would not know what to do in a panic situation, nor have the strength to overcome the drag on the steering wheel after losing power to the power steering.
3/12/10 at 12:00 AM

Don, March 12,2010 said...
I,while traveling at 40 mph, floored the accelerator and as the car took off, shifted to neutral. The motor races but car comes to stop. This procedure should advertised.
3/12/10 at 12:00 AM

Cristi said...
Just went to the dealer today and they took my car in, but then told me that it was not part of the recall because it was manufactured in Japan...I really love my Toyota but I don't know what to believe anymore...reading all this is scary :( I really hope they get to the truth of all of this very soon...aren't human lives worth anything anymore??? :(
3/12/10 at 12:00 AM

Jim Olsefski said...
Is it possible for a virus from a hacker to get into the software to discourage the use of any of Toyota products or maybe even the use of hybrid or all electric vehicles? There is a big stake for oil companies to steer people away from buying high MPG vehicles. Is there any statistics about Prius being recently serviced and the the runaway accelerator problem? If these could be correlated there might be a link. Watch the 1988 movie Tucker.
3/11/10 at 12:00 AM

Dave Nicheols said...
Why doesn't Toyota Marketing advertise to the general public that in the event that the accelator gets stuck into wide open that the driver can simply put the car in neutral. They can then simply brake to a stop. I have done this on my Prius, and it is very simple to do.
3/11/10 at 12:00 AM

Whitney Thompson said...
Didn't we learn this in driver's ed class? If the accellarateor is stuck, put the car in neutral and pull over! Do not try to shut your car off, like all the news channels are saying, this will disengage the power steering, brakes, etc. (YOU WILL CRASH!!!) For those with an automatic...neutral would be N on the gearshift...for those with a manual transmission, it's the wiggly spot that's located just under gears 1 and 3 , and just above gears 2 and 4! Pull over and call a tow or the dealer! (Dealer will pay for the tow if it is a defect!) I am a 31 year old woman that is more rapidly losing my faith in humanity! Now that I've seen what the media is proposing,"Apply the break, turn off your car"...apparently put on your helmet is next! Bottom line, if your car is on the recall list...take it in, IT'S FREE! I still stand by the fact that my Corolla and my Husband's Tacoma are the best autos on earth! If anyone wants to change, I recommend the Volkswagon that nearly killed me!
3/10/10 at 12:00 AM

Guy Richars said...
I occasionally have this problem on my Ford Focus when I don't put my foot fully on the brake. I have wide feet and if I put half my foot on the brake to slow down as I press the brake pedal down the half of my foot that is not on the brake pedal makes contact with the accelerator pedal and the car shoots ahead. If you don't know why this is happening your first reaction is to press down on the brake pedal harder which makes it worse because you are pressing the accelerator pedal harder as well. The only thing to do is lift your foot up and over to the left and then press down. A compound action that is not intuitive.
3/10/10 at 12:00 AM

Emma Whitehurst said...
I don't think it has anything to do with the carpet. I think it is the cruise control. Which is in the computer part of the car.
3/10/10 at 12:00 AM

DCCENTRAL1FOX said...
I totally agree with Ernie's statement about the RF interference with the drive by wire control systems.. Toyota should incorporate an electronic counter measure system to prevent these anomalies from happening...
3/10/10 at 12:00 AM

charles Rider said...
why is it never suggested that the car be shifted into nuetral
3/9/10 at 12:00 AM

Colombiarod said...
Why only in the USA? Are the same Toyotas' not sold or used in other countries? The odds that only Toyotas in the USA are affected must be astronomical...I'm confused.
3/9/10 at 12:00 AM

Josef Milenko said...
Lose power steering after the engine is disabled. Can be hazardous to some drivers. Not only that but the loss of power brakes.
3/5/10 at 12:00 AM

Scott Fischer said...
One person who was interview claimed she shifted into neutral but the car kept accelerating. I wonder if that is even possible, and if it speaks to a computer problem with the car in question?
3/4/10 at 12:00 AM

IVI said...
Are you suggesting sabbotage...? ...some differences in workmanship? ...of perhaps differences in critical parts (or testing of the same, before assembly into a car)?
3/3/10 at 12:00 AM

John said...
Blaming underground power lines is ridiculous. If underground power lines were to blame, then every car on the road would be experiencing problems.
3/3/10 at 12:00 AM

frank said...
I don't think that the power brake is shut down. Rather, it operates from manifold vacuum. When the throttle is wide open, the vacuum is low. Since the power brake vaccum chamber is limited in size, it quickly runs out of vacuum.
2/26/10 at 12:00 AM

Giacomo Carmicino said...
I think I have a temporary fix if the gas pedal is stuck. Put your transmission in neutral, that should desengage your transmission from the engine and be able to apply your brakes
2/23/10 at 12:00 AM

Norm7057 said...
Philip, my thoughts exactly. No car is going to get to an unmanageable speed so fast that simply turning off the ignition won't help. Or popping the transmission into neutral. I remember when a Triumph motorcycle's throttle hung completely wide open on me in downtown Nashville traffic a few years ago. It was scary for about two seconds, then I killed the ignition switch. Problem over. As far as I can tell, on all Toyotas, mine included, the gearshift selector and ignition switch are completely independent of the throttle control electronics. I really do have to wonder why the drivers in these crashes didn't simply think to do that.
2/23/10 at 12:00 AM

Robert Liggett said...
I have found your product to be very reliable and I would like to help you through this problem.....Here is my suggestion: After the brake is applied hard for 5 seconds, the engine will disable.... Just a thought to get the confidence in your vehicles again. Best of luck to you , and I will buy another Lexus!!
2/23/10 at 12:00 AM

Philip said...
Why can't the driver shift into neutral? Why can't the ignition switch be turned to the off position?
2/18/10 at 12:00 AM

Gary said...
I worked in the automotive industry for more than 36 years in various engineering positions, including Design & Development Engineering, Engineering Supervision and Testing. Even though the pedals are manufactured by both Denso and CTS does not mean that the designs and specifications provided by Toyota to both companies are identical. Denso was supplying pedals to Toyota several years before CTS so it is likely that the designs and specifications are different. I am familiar with CTS and they are an excellent company when it comes to quality. They have received numerous Supplier Quality Excellence Awards from nearly every car manufacturer to which they supply parts. I commend Toyota for not placing the blame on CTS. While I have not read every article on this subject, I have not read where Toyota has come out and exonerated CTS. While various other car companies do use CTS pedals, each pedal has it own unique design and specifications. Even though other car companies are investigating their vehicles that use CTS pedals, none (including Ford) have found problems nor have they issued a recall.
2/17/10 at 12:00 AM

Get real said...
If you think that a engine can not over power your breaks, you are wrong, try it with your own car, and if they were already driving, just for example, at 40MPH and the throttle stuck you will have a heck of a time trying to stop the car, and like mike said once the rotors and pads get hot they have less stoping power and the braking power will fade. ARCA Driver
2/16/10 at 12:00 AM

Ray said...
I have been working in garages for over 30 years and i can tell you for a fact that it is a well known issue with mats getting stuck under pedals. People who comment "it's not the mats" obviously have no experience they are calling from to make such a idiotic statement, i do.
2/15/10 at 12:00 AM

UG said...
Toyota is an american made car as much as any others are. The yaris is made in Japan and it doesn't have these problems. GM, Ford and Chrysler makes as much or more stuff in Mexico, etc as anybody. Multinational corporations know no alligience to people, just money. Wake up and smell the BS.
2/14/10 at 12:00 AM

eugene said...
I think the problem has do do with the fact that Toyotas automatically shut down the brake if you PUMP it up and down a few times, while the accelerator is also engaged; there is a youtube video on this. Of course if your vehicle accelerates out of control you will naturally want to PUMP the brake up and down like mad. Then the power brake will automatically shut down. At this point, even if you realize that you can shift to NEUTRAL, it is too late since the car is already at 120MPH and you cannot stop the vehicle! Do NOT pump your brake up and down. Shift to neutral (or reverse on a Prius which has no Neutral) and then FIRMLY hold down the brake without pumping it!
2/13/10 at 12:00 AM

Mike said...
If brakes are applied for long enough on an accelerating vehicle, the heat build up in the calipers might cause the brakes to fade and loose effectivness. After a prolonged braking, the hydrolic brake fluid could get so hot(nearly to the boiling point) that the brake pedal could be pushed to the floor with little effect.
2/11/10 at 12:00 AM

sue said...
I agree with Terry, we have 4 Toyotas in my family and when it is time to buy another car or truck it will be another Toyota. I hope the public will not be sucked into all this hype.
2/11/10 at 12:00 AM

Graeme Davenport said...
I agree with the fellow who commented on underground power lines possibly interfering with the computer, a US police dept experimented with a "rocket sled" device some years ago to halt a pursuit by launching it from the chase car to run underneath the chased vehicle and deliver a massive electronic burst which, it was said would knock out the cars computer and bring it to a halt, if this was possible then, why could not outside interference have an effect?.
2/6/10 at 12:00 AM

toytoa24 said...
they are reflashing the computers not because of a code error in the computer but for the rare ocassion that the gas pedal would stick open, by overiding the gas pedal that means that even if the pedal did stick down all the way open the brake signal would overide that and stop accelerating and would stop the vehicle. second there is no issue with the vehicle accelerating on its own the problem is that the pedal doesnt return to the closed position meaning that if you were cruising at 50 mph and then let off the gas it would still cruise at the same rate in which you had the throttle depressed due to a lag in the returning of the pedal. if you would pay attention to what is going on you would know that the pedal issue doesnt mean that while cruising or coasting to slow down or stop that the gas is going to just start to accelerate on its own
2/5/10 at 12:00 AM

DMG said...
I can't speak for the Prius but it is physically impossible for an engine to overpower fully applied brakes. Brakes are manually hydraulically controlled on all cars though most are power assisted. That said brakes can fail in runaway trucks but rare on a light car. A vehicle may accelerate or stick under some failures, but most likely this causes drivers to panic and either miss the brake or worse, hit the gas instead. This happened to me on an olds 30 years ago. I didn't blame GM. On the other hand - if cars are made totally controlled by the computer, then maybe this is Terminator 3 - the rise of the machines
2/4/10 at 12:00 AM

TerryDo said...
DO YOU SMELL A SABOTEUR? Toyota cars, all of a sudden are having auto mechanical problem. I smell a corporate sabotage. Are their competitors responsible? I would no be surprised, if somebody paid a saboteur to derail Toyota and as soon as they find out where all the cars came from, they will discover their culprit.
2/4/10 at 12:00 AM

maronne said...
Your kidding right? Or were you asleep during the 1990's when the Japanese Auto industry was in the tank?
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

Gary Luis said...
The problem is not the pedal but the electronics. The car accelerates on its own so it can't be the pedal. Fixing the pedal with a reinforced bar won't solve the problem as the problem has been stated over and over that the car accelerates on it's own. This is due to the Japanese copying the European's on this. And they need to take a clue from Audi who had that problem with their vehicles a few years ago. They solved it somehow and it wasn't the pedal.
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

littlejoe said...
You asked for it ..You got it Toyota
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

PJD said...
Why such an absurdity as an electronic, computer controlled throttle anyway? The plain old mechanical linkage or cable to the throttle plate has worked fine for 100 years, and still works fine, in my 1994 Toyota pickup truck, and a new Hyundai Elantra. Simplify, Simplify!
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

Shelley said...
CTS, the company that manufactured the accelerator pedals does not design the pedals therefore they are not responsible. They make the pedals according to the specifications Toyota provides for them. Toyota designs the cars and then finds manufacturers to produce the parts to their specifications.
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

Tom Nguyen said...
Great Points!
2/2/10 at 12:00 AM

jack pettry said...
when ford had a steering problem on the GT they paid to have each car flat bedded to the dealer. toyota should do the same
2/1/10 at 12:00 AM

Peter in Chicago said...
Nobody has discussed the cruise-control, which is an electronically controlled physical connection to the accelerator. I'm thinking the computer programs used to program this part might have a bug. What is also strange is that it appears the brakes did not work to slow the car as the problem was occuring. I'm surprised the police officer didn't put the transmission into neutral (or even into a lower-gear). Are the braking systems on these cars electronically controlled...such that they won't work? (or will they work without a computer or electronics being alive in a vehicle?) What a horrible situation for these folks..... Peter
2/1/10 at 12:00 AM

mytwocents said...
Oh, but Lexus IS a part of this. Toyota makes Lexus too.
1/31/10 at 12:00 AM

Paul Phelps said...
I am British and worked as a QA Engineer for an Engine Management Systems manufacturer in the past. Toyota has just undertaken a recall extension in Europe, of that started in the US. I concur with most of what you have said. As well as radiated energy being the possible cause of the problem, there are other electrical input errors from external sensors that could generate incorrect signals if they should malfunction. The Design Failure Mode and Effects Analysis should highlight all possible failure modes arising from malfunctioning sensor or extraneously radiated input signals. Toyota is a very professional company and I would well imagine their engineers have gone, and are still going through, all possible system scenarios that could lead to acceleration surges, if indeed this is the reason for the worldwide recall. The drive-by-wire engine management software is key to the problem. It should be robust to illogical inputs and cross-check inputs to ensure they are indeed possible. Noisy inputs generated by EMI or RFI should be filtered by hardware networks before the signal is processed, to minimize their influence on the true electrical input signals and the software processing thereafter. The bottom line is that the fuel injectors are pulsed with a modulated signal from the ECU that varies their opening times, dependent on inputs and the programmed fuel map. This in turn allows more gas into the cylinders with the resulting accelerations/decelerations accordingly. I take my hat off to Toyota for biting the bullet on this very expensive recall and I believe their professionalism and engineering will find the root cause of the problem and an effective countermeasure to resolve it.
1/30/10 at 12:00 AM

Bob Boehr said...
You and I have independently arrived at the same conclusions...unless...Toyota has a 'magic' carpet that jumps up and grabs the pedal and then pulls it down to the floorboard. Would you like to make a bet that this issue will resolved? None of the logical reasons will be addressed and this problem will continue into the future, as it has in the past.
1/30/10 at 12:00 AM

Tina Johnston said...
I just see this as another sale out ploy by big GOV to discredit the reputation of the most reliable car brands in the automotive industry to give doubt and safety to the american people to buy american made cars and the Japanese car industry is a complete sell out to the controlled lie to boost american car sells, I hope you al can read between the lies because you know where the decite comes from.....a private and coded handshake no doubt, you pay to dance with the piper one day he is coming to collect on your souls.......enough said you know I speak nonthing but the truth
1/29/10 at 12:00 AM

Upset reader said...
Lady, this death of a CHP off duty Officer has everything to do with this recall (Toyota/Lexus) Please read some more before you make a comment. Thanks
1/29/10 at 12:00 AM

haywood said...
certainly floormats can cause throttle sticking, its happened to me twice in my 45 year driving career.No biggie, turn off key one notch coast to the side of the road, free the pedal from the edge of the mat and continue...........oh throw the mat in the trunk.........
1/29/10 at 12:00 AM

Larry Mazur said...
I am a professional automotive technician and had to comment on the 'parking brake' and 'losing the power brakes when turning off the key' comments posted here. Neither of these statements are true, the emergency brake can be modulated to safely stop any vehicle without locking up the brakes. Likewise, turning off the key does not deplete the vacuum storage capability in the power brake unit. Anyone who doubts this, should practice turning off the key and stopping their vehicle using both methods, that way if you should have a problem with your throttle or brakes, you will know how to handle the situation!
1/29/10 at 12:00 AM

Greg Mathis said...
It is quite clear why Toyota is facing this problem in the USA...because the accelerator pedals are manufactured and supplied to Toyota by a USA based company called CTS Corp (CTS). How come I do not see too many people or the media screaming about this USA based parts supllier CTS Corp supplying faulty accelerator pedals to Toyota? Even Ford is having a recall because of using faulty parts supplied by CTS Corp...an USA based manufacturer!!!!
1/28/10 at 12:00 AM

adam said...
toyota stopped production and sales because it's illegal to sell vehicles which are subject to a safety recall until they have been fixed. since toyota doesn't have a fix, they can't sell these cars. unlike the engine sludge issue, they can't continue to blame the owners for this problem now that cars without floormats are still accelerating uncontrollably.
1/28/10 at 12:00 AM

JoAn Martinez said...
We bought our 2010 Camry in Davis, CA on September 11, 2009. (Perhaps the date was a bad omen). Anyway, I am very disturbed that nothing was said about a possible problem with the accelerator. To date, we have heard nothing from Toyota. We have a trip planned to Yellowstone and for economy sake we planned on driving our Camry. If the problem isn't resolved soon , we'll drive our old pickup truck (Ford). Another problem is that we bought a maintenance agreement and since we're not driving our car much, we should get an adjustment on this agreement. We'll see. Disgusted.
1/28/10 at 12:00 AM

Kraig MacKenzie said...
Hello, the point is if you take your car in for inspection maybe they can figure out the problem(if your car is one). A street level mechanic may be what's needed to figure this out. Besides, get it in the shop and off the street, it could be a danger to the rest of us also.
1/28/10 at 12:00 AM

Kevin Hutchinson said...
If this is really happen, Toyota needs to look at all electronic system that ties into any part of the system acceleration system. I would check all de-bouncing circuit (switching) that interconnect with Toyota's acceleration system. This would also includes, the EMI SHIELDING and RF SHIELDING for the electronic acceleration system. This is just think outside of the box.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

Robert DeGraff said...
I recently purchased a new 2010 Camry and am a retired professional engineer with some experience in forensic engineering investigation and have experience in applying Tepner-Tregoe analysis to puzzling situations. You have to look at "what as changed" and "what is different" between test conditions and actual field conditions in variable and extreme situations such as the reports of sudden acceleration caused or allowed by the fly by wire throttle control. The persistent but infrequent reports indicate that Toyota engineers have missed something in their testing. Although most inside engineers are resistant to suggestion from outsiders, I'll offer my comments and concerns for their review: there are several transient situations which electronic controlled vehicles must resist, commonly called EMI and RFI. 1) when you pass under, over or next to high power electric lines, not only is some energy imposed but a doppler effect can swing the frequency. Yes , some high power lines are under you, buried under the roadway such as the emergency feeders for O'Hare airport. How adequate is the EMI shielding for emissions from beneath? Some power lines are heavily loaded and emit stronger signals when they approach capacity or during surges just before and while their breakers trip. 2) cellphones, blackberies and wireless laptops also emit some strange and variable signals. I'm told that as a cellphone gets farther from its tower, it increases its power. At least 2 of the reports of apparent fly-by wire runaways mention the use of their cellphone during the incidents. Certainly these devices get very close to the car's computer(s). 3) there are stray emissions from CBs ham radios and other (sometimes illegal) broadcasting which may induce problems with RFI on computer controls. Many years ago, early computer controlled braking systems on IH trucks suffered wild scenarios until they were very throughly RF shielded. Could it be that some similar transients are affecting Toyota fly by wire throttle computer controls? I am not trying to be a wise guy; just offereing some outside ideas for them to reconsider in their testing for the elusive cause of infrequent but terrifying runaways.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

laura said...
The death of the CHP, has nothing to do with this recall. He was driving a lexus, was not familiar with the push button start, (it was a loaner vehicle) and the dealer placed the wrong aftermarket floor mats in the car.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

no said...
Thats a downhill assist, ur delay will occur as u reach the bottom of the hill. majority of customers will say the vehicle even downshifts.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

John said...
The only good thing I can for Toyota regarding its handling of this issue is that at least they didn't try to hide these early releases, which look pretty bad in light of subsequent developments. I think anyone looking at what the LA Times wrote in November, and what Irv wrote in reply, would have to say, The Times was right that the problem was worse than you said, and you were wrong to have minimized it. This combination of denial and hostility is the way the Detroit auto companies always operated when they were caught out on defects, and it's a big part of the reason their reputations are so tarnished today. I'm sorry to see Toyota following in their footsteps.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

Robin said...
Well, you are looking at this from your computer chair. It's easy to say "just do this and this" when you are calm and have time to think. Wait until it becomes and emergency and then let's see how you react. You can't call people stupid for their behavior in an emergency until you've been there yourself. Maybe the person didn't have time to do all the procedures before an accident occurs. I think you are being too harsh. As for the mats/gas pedal. The thing that makes it different for the cars they are naming as having issues is that the design of the pedal and the thicker floor mats are the problem. The gas pedal on my daughters Matrix is long and nearly touches the floor without a mat under it. If she had the thicker, all weather mats under there, I can see it getting stuck. Now...whether that is the issue or not is to be seen.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

SUE said...
HAD A CADILLAC DEVILLE THAT THE FUEL INJECTOR STUCK ON - THEY HAD RECALLS AND DEATHS ON THEM - WENT LIKE CRAZY INTO UPWARD SPINNING CRUISE CONTROL. BURNED OUT MY BRAKES AND GOT IT STOPPED IN NEUTRAL WHILE THE ENGINE REVVED LIKE A JET.
1/27/10 at 12:00 AM

Lovely said...
I do not have a problem with the floor mat but if i am going down hill too fast and tip the brakes a little then hit the gas again there is a delayed reaction in the acceleration. Where do i go with this issue? I live in New York with a lot of hills.
1/25/10 at 12:00 AM

Joan said...
I'am happy with my toyota. Have had no problems. Mats stay in place. For the accelaration problem. Why not cut the engine and then put in neutural. Seem like that would take care of the problem.
1/22/10 at 12:00 AM

michelle said...
Here is what I don't understand. Why anyone would think that we should even have to have this conversation. I just purchased a new Toyota LAST WEEK! and less than a week later I hear about all of this! When you purchase a vehicle you should have the peace of mind when you drive it, and what I am is scared. We should'nt have to know all of the things you just said, because this should never happen! I don't care what the problem is, I just want it fixed before more people die from disfunctional vehicles!
1/22/10 at 12:00 AM

Toyota AE86-KP61 Fan said...
Good point, Wes - Other luxury manufacturers that use systems where the brake cancels throttle use a system that allows use of the brake and throttle in situations like you had talked about. But it is when you use really sharp angles of throttle and brake that the system cuts throttle. If Toyota does the same thing, it shouldn't be that big of an issue. I know some Toyotas have a hill start assist control that stops you from rolling back when starting from a stop on a hill. I know my Tacoma D-cab TRD Off-Road edition has it.
1/22/10 at 12:00 AM

Critical Thinker said...
Hey Bill--- I don't have to try it because Car & Driver magazine already tried it and published their results. Here's what they found: A V6 Camry with a throttle stuck wide open travelling at 70 MPH takes 18 feet more distance to stop than the same car travelling at 70 MPH without the throttle stuck wide open.
1/4/10 at 12:00 AM

Paula Walker said...
What kind of Toyota do you have?? There is no PARK button on the dashboard of my 2008 Camry Solara Convertible.
12/28/09 at 12:00 AM

AJ said...
Sudden acceleration does concern me, particularly with the tragic deaths of the CHP Officer and his family. Still, one has to question: If this is truly Toyota's fault and/or negligence, why are we hearing about it ONLY IN THE UNITED STATES? I've heard or read nothing about this problem occurring in Toyota products in other countries. It's conceivable that Toyota could hide some dirty laundry behind a phalanx of oily American lawyers, but c'mon...does anyone really think such a widespread problem could be so effectively hidden when emanating from multiple sources around the globe? Something's amiss here.
12/24/09 at 12:00 AM

Roger said...
Bring your Camry to a Toyota Dealer. Then they can do a computer diagnostic and see if you have any problems as you state, especifically with the Electronic Acelerator. I am an engineer of its competition and I sincerely doubt this is an electronic issue with the ECU.
12/23/09 at 12:00 AM

JR said...
911 call was made by the driver's brother-in-law sitting in the backseat.....
12/21/09 at 12:00 AM

JR said...
I wondered why a California Highway Patrolman would not have thought to do all those things. Why? I am suspicious and, as a Lexus owner a bit scared to think, he did try those techniques and none of them worked. Toyota needs to be extremely proactive or folks like me will make the December to Remember move to Mercedes.
12/21/09 at 12:00 AM

Ira Sorkin said...
The best and easiest way to shift into neutral is to push the PARK button on the dashboard. The computer will shift into neutral. If you do this with the shifter it will take a few seconds for the computer to do the shift. This was probably designed in case of error. If you shift into neutral early into the runaway you can brake normally. You may burn out your engine but since there is no way to turn it off it's a small price to pay for your life. I have experimented by flooring the throttle and pressing the PARK button. It seems to work. If you play the transmission between drive and neutral you can even drive a short distance to get out of traffic.
12/8/09 at 12:00 AM

jenny said...
I think Toyota has been a reliable company for a very long time and the only car my family buys BUT this is not an issue of a floor mat getting stuck!!! It is not an issue of "stupid people not knowing how to stop their vehicle"!!! It is a defect in the cars that causes them to begin going over 100mph! Try thinking logically when your car all of a sudden, without warning, goes over 120 mph. Stop calling people names and watch the news once in a while!!! If this was a matter of floor mats getting stuck don't you think other car makers would have this problem. It is NOT stuck floor mats... how many people do you see driving around w/ their floor mats scrunched up so far they are jamming the accelerator??? yeah, no one I've ever seen
12/7/09 at 12:00 AM

Wes Lum said...
I suggest you review how people in hilly cities use brake and gas pedal simultaneously when advancing from a stop. Your kill the engine solution may have unintended consequences.
12/6/09 at 12:00 AM

Dan Glunt said...
Don't use the "emergency" brake, it is actually a "parking" brake. You don't want to loose traction. The car has ABS. And don't turn the key off or you may loose your power brakes. Just put it in neutral and press the brake as usual. I do not represent Toyota and am not an automotive professional. Do not rely on opinions on the internet for your personal safety, but if you turned the key off and jamed on the parking brake I would feel bad if I had not responded. Good luck!
12/3/09 at 12:00 AM

IT Support said...
when you read too much and get scared enough, press Alt+F4 to escape all toyota problems
12/1/09 at 12:00 AM

joe sampson said...
Emergency brakes have no real power power to stop a car. Auto engines have much more avalable powe tha brakes. Test it your self, hold the gas petal to the floor, then apply brakes, good luck!!!!
12/1/09 at 12:00 AM

Ryan C said...
Dear Toyota, I'm not sure who you think you're kidding with pretending that the floormats are the issue. It seems like, from a marketing perspective, it would be better to face this issue head on and admit your mistake. That way you can make progress towards a real fix and start to salvage your reputation with customers. Blaming the problem on your customers seems to be a counterintuitive way to approach the issue. Ryan
11/30/09 at 12:00 AM

Brenda said...
I just bought my very first Toyota but didn't know about the recall until after the fact. All this stuff frightens me. I made sure I know where the neutral position is. I questioned my salesman about the proper procedure after I found about it and he said they were instructed to tell owners to (1) shift into neutral and (2) to "stand" on the brakes. Should the emrgency brake be used as well? And if the switch is turned off, will the brakes still work? I am almost scared to drive my Camry now. Thank you.
11/30/09 at 12:00 AM

Bob Davis said...
Intermittent software problems may be at the root of some of this; there are plenty of instances in the academic literature of similar issues with real-time control systems. Just check out the case of the Therac-25 medical device. The manufacturer there thought they had solved the problem several times, but then discovered much later that they did not truly understand the root cause of a rare issue. I hope someone from Toyota takes me seriously on this -- as a goodwill gesture, Toyota should subject the engine control software to outside review by software safety specialists. Or better yet, make the code open-source so hundreds of graduate students can scrutinize the code for race-conditions, deadlocks, and other rare events which may contribute to unusual operation. The alternative? Just look what happened to Audi. Most corporate PR flacks disregard ideas that do not spring from within -- are you strong enough to embrace the ideas of outside experts? Bob
11/29/09 at 12:00 AM

Ed O said...
Folks are you forgetting that it was a California Highway Patrol officer at the wheel in the most published incident? You think that he was a fool and did not know how to drive a car? Every CHP is a professionally trained driver and is well aware of "shift into neutral, don't hit accelerator when trying to brake" and all of the rest. Yet he could not stop the vehicle at all and the malfunction lasted long enough for a 911 call! In several of these incidents tires are smoking as the car is accelerating - which indicates brakes were firmly applied. Nuts behind the wheel? Or behind the keyboards?
11/29/09 at 12:00 AM

mic said...
the problem is not the floor mats,and you no,
11/29/09 at 12:00 AM

Astrid said...
Part of the problem is push-ignition, which means you have to push and hold the button to turn the car off - not exactly intuitive in an emergency situation. I don't know whether they tried shifting to neutral, though. I think the parking brake failed.
11/29/09 at 12:00 AM

Makana said...
You are an idiot, go ahead and buy that POS Cadillac, you'll swear up and down you should have stayed with toyota.
11/27/09 at 12:00 AM

RR said...
Informitive insight ,THANK YOU
11/27/09 at 12:00 AM

Ed Sanders said...
Your criticism does not take into account that the runaway speed is swifter than afterthought and most people will automatically step on the brakes which did not work this very moment &would be too late. and followed by your recommendation after that would be way too late. Not everyone is as bright and wonderful driver as you are. even doing what you
11/27/09 at 12:00 AM

Stuck Throttle Survivor (several times o said...
Is there something about a newer car that makes it impossible to shut the engine off with the throttle wide open? Even cars with RF keys have a shut-off button. Is that button disabled when the throttle is open? Some cars nowadays are fully "drive-by-wire", i.e. there is on direct connection between the controls - accelerator and brake pedal, and on some, even the steering wheel - and the mechanical systems... it's all controlled by the ECU. True, your brakes can ALWAYS overpower your engine, but in a full drive-by-wire system, could faulty logic make it impossible to stop the car or kill the engine? I have trouble believing that could be the case, but hearing the 911 call from that fellow as his Toyota (or Lexus, I can't recall) sped towards an intersection makes me think that if you've got the ability to find your cell phone, dial it, and engage in a conversation with a 911 operator, that you'd have the wherewithall to shut the car off or step on the brakes. Sadly that fellow and his family were killed. I stryggle to understand how something like that could happen. Me? I've had my throttle stick wide open 3 times. Once on a '67 GTO. After a second or two to fathom what the heck was going on, I pushed in the clutch. The engine revved up past the redline and I got 'valve float' for a split second before I switched off the ignition. Cause: faulty carb linkage. Second time was on a VW many years later. That time I just switched the key off immediately, but turned it far enough to lock the steering wheel. After a cecond of panic, I turned the key to unlock the wheel and pulled off the road. Cause: stuck throttle cable. The last time was in another VW. The accelerator pedal broke off where it attached to the floor and got wedged in a throttle open position. I was able to kick it free with my foot. Cause: the floor was rusted under the carpet and the rivets broke loose. My point - after a few moments of panic you can stop your car with the throttle stuck open, and EVERYONE needs to know how to do this - even if you never encounter the situation. Just like you learn how to steer out of a skid - you rehearse it mentally, and then when the time comes, you pull up your mental script and execute it. I'd really like to know if the people injured and/or killed in their Toyota's just reacted badly in a panic situation, or if there is something about modern electronic systems that makes stopping a car with a stuck throttle impossible.
11/26/09 at 12:00 AM

O.W.A. Feeling said...
The current Lexus December to Remember campaign does a great job promoting "unintended acceleration". The car lurches forward during the advertisement on numerous occassions--could Toyota be any more insensitive to the seriousness of this safety concern.
11/26/09 at 12:00 AM

Michael said...
I wondering why the persons that had a run away car didn't turn off the ignition key? Take the car out of gear ? use the parking brake ? Shift to reverse ? or neutral ? sideswipe a guard rail ? I do not think the details I have heard should be blamed on the car. It very much sounds like operator error. I feel the accident should have been avoided. Why is there not a kill switch!
11/26/09 at 12:00 AM

Chris said...
No, you cannot expect them to do that. Be vigilant and keep those carpets clean!! Can I suggest a nice extractor??
11/26/09 at 12:00 AM

Chris Wertman said...
Ha Ha!! I am not 35 and my mom gave me the EXACT same advice when i started driving. Yes, my whole family drives manual trans.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Ron said...
I support Ford because my son is a engineer for them in Detroit, Toyota says they are the most built car in America, show me proof. I can say anything, prove it. If you haven't driven the new Taurus, you can't knock Ford. Ford didn't take any government money, as so many toyota owners say they did. They only applied for a Federal Grant like every other car manufacturer in the USA did, Toyota included. Hybrid is not the answer. Beau where do you get your info??? FORD DID NOT TAKE GOVERNMENT MONEY.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Jim said...
As usual the Obama Admin got ti wrong since VW is now the number one seller. they went after the wrong guys.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Peter said...
I have owned and driven many toyotas starting way back with a Corona from the early 70's. I have always been partial to toyotas. They have been very reliable in my opinion. I have worked on cars since the age of thirteen. I put myself through college buying restoring and then reselling cars. I have worked as a mechanic. So what? Well here's the thing. Everyone talks about people being idiots. And the paranoid scam issues. Get a grip! When an accelerator pedal gets stuck, why not just step on the brake. Power assisted brakes work off the vacuum created by the engine. This vacuum is depleted when the trottle is open. Thus rendering the brakes useless. Ok. So that's a bad idea. Well lets just step on the clutch, slip it into neutral etc. Well, here's what happens. The engine is being told to accelerate. There is nothing for the engine to push, ie neutral clutch ... Engine rpm goes inter galactic motor dies before you can say amen. I have seen this happen. I am not sure why people are calling others idiots, or accusing Obama of scams. I am certain that this is a real issue. So if you have facts, let us all know. If you have a conspiracy theory, or feel that everyone else is stupid, well .... what can I say?
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

JJ said...
I still don't quite understand how the mat can cause the pedal to accelerate...I've had my '04 Solara for 5 years now and the mat has never moved. BTW, does anyone know if this recall includes Solaras? It's technically a Camry, but I'm not sure.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Erika said...
I don't understand why this is even an issue! People must be stupid if they don't know what to do if the gas pedal gets stuck. Maybe they shouldn't even be driving in the first place. If you cant figure out how to stop your own vehicle you really have problems. Come on now this doesn't just happen with Toyota it could happen with any car if you dont keep your factory floor mats in the vehicle or move them around at all... I have had a Toyota for 30 years and will keep on buying them. They will out last the competition any day!!!!
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Bill said...
What you say is true if your engine is idling; but try it under realistic circumstances of full throttle, and car mass in motion at highway speed.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Terri said...
I'm with ya, Erika on my loyalty to Toyota. They're the only car/van/truck I've owned since 1978. QUALITY & RELIABILITY x 1000000. As far as the people who don't know what to do if they can't get their accelerator unstuck....PUT VEHICLE IN NEUTRAL AND TURN OFF THE KEY. No power, no gas.
11/25/09 at 12:00 AM

Pretty safe teen driver said...
there is an easy fix to all problems. buy manual transmission. if the car starts accelerating hard, drop the clutch. engines dies, use the hand brake to slow the car down to a stop. there, a 17y/o fixed all your problems.
11/24/09 at 12:00 AM

Critical Thinker said...
Audi went through a similar problem years ago. "Unitended Acceleration" became the catch-phrase for them as a bunch of Audi owners complained that their vehicles suddenly took off and they were unable to stop them. Never once did an investigation prove that there was anything wrong with the vehicles. The real problem was a simple one--it was just the nut behind the wheel. These fools swore up and down that they were pressing the brake pedal as hard as they could, yet the vehicle kept accelerating. But we all know now that they were really pressing on the accelerator pedal, not the brake pedal. If anyone doubts it, try this simple experiment: Go out to your car and press down on the acclerator pedal and the brake pedal at the same time. Your car will not move. No car on earth can overpower it's brakes. So to all the people who claim that they were not able to stop their Toyota, get over it and learn how to drive. The brake pedal is NOT the one on the right side.
11/23/09 at 12:00 AM

tacoma owner said...
If the acceleration issue is caused by misplaced floor mats, drivers of all vehicles regardless of make/model should verify their mats are secure. It is difficult to understand how only Toyota vehicles are effected by a floor mat which has migrated toward accelerator, brake and clutch pedals.
11/23/09 at 12:00 AM

Tom Roberts said...
Floor mats can get wedged between the floor tunnel and the gas pedal. Seen it several times in my thirty-eight years in automobile service. Trim some material, get different mats, anchor the existing ones in some manner; there are numerous solutions to that problem. There is, however, no solution to the human condition that pervades the species which dictates that we seldom own up to our own mistakes. Yes, the ONLY incidents of sudden unintended acceleration I've ever seen were when the driver stepped on the wrong pedal, or both pedals at the same time, as I have done many times. There is no cover up. There is no faulty engineering. There are only human beings who just can't CONCEIVE that they would make that kind of mistake. Now, having said that, there ARE a couple of ways a throttle can stick partly open and not want to return to idle when the operator lifts his or her foot. Cable operated throttles can eventually fray and stick in their sheaths, but there are early signs of this which, if not ignored, can be easily fixed. No mystery. Throttle plates can accumulate sticky buildup of what's left when unburned gasoline builds up inside the air/fuel metering system, but can be cleaned by any good garage. Electronically operated throttles open only after many conditions are met in the vehicle's powertrain control module and when those conditions are not registered, it shuts down. Never does it act like a possessed quarter horse and take you for the scariest ride you've ever had with no ability to stop it. Toyota's suggested actions when you experience a vehicle that doesn't want to slow down are simple and effective. I would go so far as to suggest you practice doing them on a back road with no traffic so that it is a natural reaction if you encounter the need. Above all, relax. Stop worrying that there's a hidden gremlin just waiting to strike when you least expect it. It doesn't exist. Besides, as any mechanical engineer can attest, a vehicle's braking system generates many times more horsepower than the vehicle's engine. If that doesn't make sense, research it. You'll see. I'm not affiliated with Toyota in any manner except for being a very satisfied customer, despite making a living with a domestic brand vehicle. The factories ALL get a bum rap on this subject and I'm sure the personal injury lawyers just hate to hear that said. Toyota can't categorically deny these allegations due to the knee jerk reaction from yellow journalists and fear mongers with the attendant bad publicity. I'm sorry to rant and rave, but this is a real hot button for me and only reinforces my opinion that we are ALL afraid of things we don't understand.
11/22/09 at 12:00 AM

Scott said...
If it is an electronic glitch you can try and duplicate the problem a million times before it reoccures. Mechanical and electronic problems are two totaly different beasts.
11/22/09 at 12:00 AM

A.H said...
It's pretty bad that Toyota is trying to pass off the uncomanded acceleration is do to a floor mat. You are trying to pass off a bad Engineering design that you are trying to put under the mat. DEAL with it. Sad what happened to the police officer and his family due to an inferior product!!!!!!!
11/22/09 at 12:00 AM

Neil said...
I have been a life long GM owner that now switch to Toyota. Should have bought a Cadillac.
11/21/09 at 12:00 AM

Jim said...
A. Fahl, It seems remarkable that you first praise Toyota then blame them for something it appears is your own fault. My floormats have never moved nor come loose from the hooks/clips. When I do remove the mats, I make sure the clips are properly aligned and the mats are properly held in place by the clips. Quit bitching and take some personal responsibility for your actions (or in-actions).
11/21/09 at 12:00 AM

J MOLINA said...
NO PROBLEMS WITH YOUR TWO LEXUS? WHY CHANGE TO ANOTHER BECAUSE MEDIA IS GOING AFTER TOYOTA NOW? REMEMBER THIS IS THE PRICE YOU PAY FOR BEING #1... IT ALWAYS HAPPENS. I THINK YOU SHOULD BUY YOUR 3RD LEXUS YOU WON'T REGRET IT.
11/21/09 at 12:00 AM

Jenni Thompson said...
Stop promoting hearsay because that helps no one. Only report what has personally happened to you on a web site that Toyota cannot edit. As for the floor mats...there's a multitude of floor mats out there. Do you know which ones will fix or not prevent the problem? At least Toyota is telling you not to replace it with something that could possibly make the problem worse. Just take the floor mats out and read the stuff Toyota sends you. YOU have to decide what DATA/information is trust-worthy versus just wild rumors and make your own decisions.
11/20/09 at 12:00 AM

anonymous said...
I believe toyota does not know the real problem. My car has accelerated twice on its own. However I don't believe it was due to the car mats because when it did accelerate it accelerated maybe an additional 5 mph for 2 seconds and released on its own. The gas pedal was no where near the floor mat! If it had been i would have had to dislodge the mat and the car would have been going way faster. The only way the gas pedal could potentially get stuck to the gas pedal is if you press on it all the way. Who goes that fast to begin with any way? Toyota is lying. This is an interim measure because they don't know what it going on and they need to protect themselves for the time being.
11/20/09 at 12:00 AM

Dave said...
The fix is achieved through a "campaign." Campaign: a systematic course of aggressive activities for some specific purpose. See?
11/19/09 at 12:00 AM

Ann B said...
If you research, you will find comments from people who experienced the accelaration problem while they had NO floormats. Many of these incidents did not end up in an accident situation, but were reported anyway. Toyota is lying. Better if they admit that there is an electrical or mechanical malfunction than lie and possibly cause more deaths. Not to mention loss of confidence in their company and their products.
11/17/09 at 12:00 AM

Ruth said...
Campaign remedy? Campaign? Why is a campaign necessary to fix the problem? Just fix it.
11/17/09 at 12:00 AM

Dan said...
I live in the snowbelt of northern NY, are you going to replace my carpeting if I don't use my all weather rubber floor mats to catch the snow and salt? I've own my Camry for a year and am disappointed. My father has owned nothing but Toyota and I thought I would trade in the Honda for a Camry. I think the quality on the interior is extremely poor and can only hope the lack of quality doesn't affect anything but cosmetic stuff. I've also had to have my brakes services because poor design allows grit in the sliders and shims, not because they're worn. Unless there are drastic improvements I will go back to honda's.
11/15/09 at 12:00 AM

Sid Rose said...
My wife and I have two Lexus RX's (2005 and 2010) and it is extremely important to us that you answer, point by point, the allegations and contentions appearing in the L.A. Times (Sunday edition, 11/8/09). For your information, our 2010 RX350 is the ninth Lexus we have owned or leased. Until now we have loved driving your cars, but, after reading the L.A. Times 11/08/09, we are now seriously alarmed and concerned about the safety and reliability of our Lexus vehicles.
11/14/09 at 12:00 AM

Maria said...
That makes a lot of sense to me...wonder why the people affected didn't try that?
11/13/09 at 12:00 AM

Barbara M. Woogerd said...
I'm very interested in buying a SCION which I viewed and drove at the Toyota dealership. But I'm very concerned with the surge problem. Has there been a solution to it?
11/10/09 at 12:00 AM

Isaac Helgens said...
It's an interim measure because people still want their floor mats. The NHTSA wants to see a modification that changes the design of the vehicle to prevent the issue from occuring, which removing the floor mats does not do. The Lexus LS400 had a gas pedal hinged from the floor which prevents this type of thing from happending - implementing such a system would be the type of fix the NHTSA is looking for.
11/10/09 at 12:00 AM

Joe said...
Your already have convince yourself. You have bought two already! Have you had a problem? Bet Not.
11/10/09 at 12:00 AM

Mike said...
"But it is simply an interim measure.” If the floor mat is the only problem, then why would this be just an "interim measure"? Seems like it would be a permanent solution, UNLESS there is more to the problem! Hard to understand how a floor mat could suddenly cause the accelerator pedal to go full throttle...maybe not release it completely if the edge got pushed up on the pedal, but to suddenly slam the pedal to the floor? In the meantime, PLAN AHEAD...just put the gear shift in neutral IMMEDIATELY and then stop normally and turn off the engine. DON'T PANIC!!
11/8/09 at 12:00 AM

Lisa C. Smith said...
Let's get responsible media!!!! Check It Out, Investigate before you report. We are starting to not trust anything you report. We have put you in a position of important news reporting. Do you MEDIA folks want to keep your jobs or what? Where is the Integrity? The recalll issue with Toyota Prius driver side floor mat does NOT include the floor mats that were in the vehicle when we purchased our Prius. They are talking about "after market" mud mats. Call your local Toyota dealerships service depart- ments and talk with them about this issue. Thank you
11/7/09 at 12:00 AM

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